Sprung the dating game ds walkthrough becky omarian dating

11-Jan-2019 18:55

There are 50 different scenes between Brett and Becky, and the amount of time it takes you to get through the game can vary wildly depending, basically, on how lucky you get.Taking the straightest path through some scenes can take fewer than a minute, while it's possible to get stuck on one of the more complex scenes for a good half hour.Consequently, this grind sucks the fun out of what is otherwise a fairly whimsical experience.To the game's credit, there are a few scenes that both require some actual deductive reasoning and present some pretty good challenges, though you'll feel like you're being pushed down a very narrow path, with no real control over the proceedings.Players "flirt" their way through conversations; player responses influence the resulting NPC dialogue.Sprung can be regarded as a dating sim, though the linearity and variety in the game (as well as its humor) lend it more to being an adventure game. Brett and Becky have been longtime friends for as long as they could remember. Their feelings for one another made both of them go on the trip together as an attempt to find not only love but promising future opportunities.Though it doesn't really push the technical capabilities of the DS, Sprung does have a fairly distinct look to it, and it uses 2D sprites to represent the characters.

The writing in Sprung is actually one of the strongest points of the game, and despite some occasional corniness and a few awkward turns, the dialogue is pretty good, which gives you a good sense of each of the characters, though many of them rely on cookie-cutter stereotypes.

Though the dating simulation genre has enjoyed success for years in Japan, romance and gaming have remained fairly mutually exclusive in the United States.

There seems to be a trend emerging, though, and Ubisoft's Sprung is right on the forefront of it.

Each character has his or her own story, and these stories are broken up into series of scenes.

These scenes vary in length and complexity, but for the most part, they boil down to engaging in conversation (by way of a standard dialogue tree) and subsequently steering the conversation toward a specific outcome, which usually involves getting involved with a member of the opposite sex, foiling another character's plans, or playing matchmaker for other characters.

The writing in Sprung is actually one of the strongest points of the game, and despite some occasional corniness and a few awkward turns, the dialogue is pretty good, which gives you a good sense of each of the characters, though many of them rely on cookie-cutter stereotypes.

Though the dating simulation genre has enjoyed success for years in Japan, romance and gaming have remained fairly mutually exclusive in the United States.

There seems to be a trend emerging, though, and Ubisoft's Sprung is right on the forefront of it.

Each character has his or her own story, and these stories are broken up into series of scenes.

These scenes vary in length and complexity, but for the most part, they boil down to engaging in conversation (by way of a standard dialogue tree) and subsequently steering the conversation toward a specific outcome, which usually involves getting involved with a member of the opposite sex, foiling another character's plans, or playing matchmaker for other characters.

The interface is simple, so you'll see your character's picture on the lower screen, and the person you're chatting with will appear on the top screen.