Online dating for ill people

23-Nov-2018 12:50

The site, which launched last year, is becoming a go-to spot online where singletons who also happen to have diseases from hepatitis to herpes to irritable bowel syndrome can find love and companionship without having to worry about the big reveal.

P4L, which has 1,200 members, is one of a rapidly growing set of niche dating Web sites for people with disabilities and disease.

Recently, she met a local man with diabetes and a deteriorating bone condition, and the pair—who are both single parents—have become an item.

“I’m not scared of anyone who would stigmatize me,” she says.And if one person is bipolar, the divorce rate can be 90 percent, Stephanie Buehler, Psy D, a psychologist and sex therapist, tells Yahoo Health.Left of the Dial: A Memoir of Schizophrenia, Recovery, and Hope, emphasizes that like a physical disease or a personality trait, mental illness is only a part of someone." data-reactid="15"But Bruni, who wrote Left of the Dial: A Memoir of Schizophrenia, Recovery, and Hope, emphasizes that like a physical disease or a personality trait, mental illness is only a part of someone."Even if they don't have the exact same illness, I'm hoping to find somebody that would understand what I go through and not see it as a burden," says David Eisikovits, 45, whose bowel disorder frequently forces him to stay inside.Ricky Durham created the Web site after watching his brother Keith grow increasingly lonely after being diagnosed with Crohn's disease: "It was really hard for him to tell someone he had a colostomy bag." Even though his primary goal was to connect people with the same condition, he ended up tapping into an underserved market—people with not one health problem but two or three.

“I’m not scared of anyone who would stigmatize me,” she says.

And if one person is bipolar, the divorce rate can be 90 percent, Stephanie Buehler, Psy D, a psychologist and sex therapist, tells Yahoo Health.

Left of the Dial: A Memoir of Schizophrenia, Recovery, and Hope, emphasizes that like a physical disease or a personality trait, mental illness is only a part of someone." data-reactid="15"But Bruni, who wrote Left of the Dial: A Memoir of Schizophrenia, Recovery, and Hope, emphasizes that like a physical disease or a personality trait, mental illness is only a part of someone.

"Even if they don't have the exact same illness, I'm hoping to find somebody that would understand what I go through and not see it as a burden," says David Eisikovits, 45, whose bowel disorder frequently forces him to stay inside.

Ricky Durham created the Web site after watching his brother Keith grow increasingly lonely after being diagnosed with Crohn's disease: "It was really hard for him to tell someone he had a colostomy bag." Even though his primary goal was to connect people with the same condition, he ended up tapping into an underserved market—people with not one health problem but two or three.

"My members are signing up with obesity, diabetes deafness—some have five conditions," says Durham.